‘I Don’t Have The Balls To Do It’| Ochocinco Gets Real About His Friend Antonio Brown On ‘The Pivot Podcast’

In a special episode of the newly-launched “The Pivot Podcast,” star former NFL wide receiver Chad “Ochocinco” Johnson joined hosts Ryan Clark, Channing Crowder and Fred Taylor to discuss the recent controversies involving All-Pro wide receiver Antonio Brown and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

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 After a debut episode that has amassed 250K views in just three days, on top of racking up over 30K subscribers to their YouTube page, the hosts returned midweek to talk about the firestorm of controversy surrounding the mercurial and talented diva receiver and invited Ochocinco, who is friends with Brown and has his own experience as a lightning rod of controversy.

 “That’s my guy, I fucking love A.B.,” said Ochocinco. “That’s something that I wouldn’t have done, because I don’t have the balls to do it. I don’t know what transpired for that to happen. We don’t know. I don’t condone what he did, but I f-cking love A.B.”
 “There’s only so much information I can give him. There’s only so much I can do. You live and you learn. One of the best teachers in life is experience. You have to go through those ups and downs.”

 

 

A former teammate of Brown’s on the Pittsburgh Steelers, Clark has publicly feuded with Brown in the past but says in the episode that he reached out to Brown after the events of last Sunday’s game against the New York Jets.

“I told him that I’m sorry for what’s happened in the past,” said Clark. “I told him I would love to help him clear this up.”
 “My main concern is the enablers,” added Taylor. “A.B. says football is what he does, not who he is. People have to respect his upbringing and who he is. Who he is has been in there since before the check came. I believe that A.B. knows exactly what he’s doing, what he wants to do and where he wants to go.”

The group dive into numerous topics involving Brown’s saga, including mental health concerns, how analysts should talk about Brown and Ochocinco’s “breeding” strategy for producing athletic offspring.

 

They also end up having a lively debate about private vs. public schools and asking Ochocinco to give his thoughts on the Cincinnati Bengals playoff chances.

Ochocinco has had his share of controversial moments during his NFL career and in retirement. 

He was also the kind of receiver who would have issues if he didn’t get targeted enough. But the man formerly known as Chad Ochocinco — he changed his surname from Johnson to Ochocinco and then back to Johnson between 2008 and 2012 — never complained over potential bonuses he was missing.

He genuinely felt that he was the team’s best offensive weapon and gave them the best chance to win. The extra stuff — the over-the-top TD celebrations and trash talking — was for the show. The brand. And NFL fans ate it up.

Of course, AB is the hottest topic right now, and as someone who has a direct relationship with the receiver who was recently cut by the Tampa Bay Bucs after undressing on the field and jogging to the tunnel in the third quarter of a game against the Jets last Sunday, Ochocinco is more qualified than most to speak to AB’s intentions, mental state and clarify any misconceptions about him as a person.


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JR Gamble joined The Shadow League in 2012. The General Manager of Content & Social Media is in his 25th year of covering sports and culture professionally. He has covered a wide variety of major sports and entertainment topics across different mediums, including radio, newspapers, magazines and national TV. His passion is baseball, the culturing of baseball and preserving and documenting the historically-impactful accomplishments and contributions of African-Americans in baseball.