Dak Prescott Is The Blue Print | New Plush Contract, Endorsements Are Rolling & He’s the QB For The NFL’s Most Polarizing Franchise

The Dallas Cowboys Quarterback Is An Example of a “Franchise QB” That Future Black Quarterbacks Should Emulate

 

When Rayne Dakota Prescott suffered his horrendous ankle injury seven and a half months ago, many felt for him.

The compound fracture not only derailed the quarterback’s season, but he was sitting out the reminder of the season on a franchise tag (the designation a team may apply to an unrestricted free agent, binding the player to the team for one year).

The following thought in every NFL fans’ mind was, “How would this injury affect his chances of acquiring a long-term deal with the Dallas Cowboys?”

As the season progressed, Dak’s absence inadvertently showed his worth and answered questions.

While Dak was healthy the first five games according to Danny Hill, the Dallas Cowboys offense ranked 1st in the NFL in total points scored, passing, and total yards.

Following the injury, the Cowboys offensive lead by backup QB’s Andy Dalton, Garret Gilbert, Cooper Rush, and Ben DiNucci – ranked 32nd in the league in many categories.

The offensive difficulties trickled to the other side of the ball which lead to historic defensive struggles; allowing a franchise record 473 points and the second-most yards in the team’s history. 

Dak’s presence on the field and in the locker was greatly missed. It was clear when Dallas took on their division rival The Washington Football Team week 7. Cowboys’ linebacker Jaylon Smith’s back was to the ball.

He had no idea where he was when he plowed into Washington’s Tight End Logan Thomas, forcing an incompletion. The Cowboys linebacker immediately began to celebrate his play only then to be penalized for pass interfere.

Or when the Washington Football Team knocked Dallas quarterback Andy Dalton out of the game on a cheap shot and his teammates gave a passive response. The issue was clear, no real leadership. Their 2-5 record at the time cemented their woes.

“He was at the point where he had complete control of that offense,” an NFL coordinator familiar with game-planning against the Cowboys told ESPN’s Jeremy Fowler regarding Prescott before the injury. “He’s putting them in the right plays and has a real chemistry with offensive coordinator Kellen Moore. He’ll take what the defense gives him. He might not be top-top tier, but he’s close.”

Dak’s reach extends to the front office as well. His great relationship with Owner Jerry Jones and his son Stephen Jones took place from the beginning.

Examples such as choosing to remain standing for The National Anthem, pledging 1 million dollars for police reform, or the Cowboys relying on him to stay on “brand” at podiums in press conferences; are some of many instances where his value is highlighted beyond the field of play. Since day one in Dallas, he has had the “it” factor.

His ability to lead and franchise player tendencies has earned him a new 4-year, 160 million deal with the Cowboys and a 5-year deal with Jordan Brand to become the company’s only quarterback and highest-paid NFL Athlete. Not even including his other endorsements with Sleep Number and Pepsi, you can say Dak is doing well for himself.

 

 

 

Prescott has figured out how to quarterback within the role of being a quarterback. His value expands throughout the Dallas Cowboys organization. He has market ability, plus he is a team player and company-first guy.

He understood the polarizing glamour that comes from being a Dallas Cowboy and has handled the responsibility with poise. His leadership and overall importance to an organization was essential to receiving his lucrative deals this off season. 

To all the young players – take note from my future comeback player of the year choice Dak Prescott – show value within the organization and you will be rewarded.

Matthew is a native of Donaldsonville, Louisiana by way of Smoke Bend who currently resides in Washington D.C. He loves to read autobiographies, any type of history and The New Yorker.  He is a soccer fanatic and Chelsea connoisseur.