fbpx

Segregation Said To Be A Link To Lung Cancer For African-Americans

A recent study published in JAMA Surgery has found that African-Americans who live in highly segregated communities are significantly more likely to die from lung cancer than those from less segregated ones.

A recent study published in JAMA Surgery has found that African-Americans who live in highly segregated communities are significantly more likely to die from lung cancer than those from less segregated ones.

We already know it’s hard to be black in America. And this is yet another reminder of how hard the struggle can be.  Sabrina Tavernise of the New York Times lays out some potential causes of the increased mortality rates.  

The study was the first to look at segregation as a factor in lung cancer mortality. Its authors said they could not fully explain why it worsens the odds of survival for African-Americans, but hypothesized that blacks in more segregated areas may be less likely to have health insurance or access to health care and specialty doctors. It is also possible that lower levels of education mean they are less likely to seek care early, when medical treatment could make a big difference. Racial bias in the health care system might also be a factor.

My people please pay attention to what's going on and take charge of your health.