Jets’ Jamal Adams Says “Perfect Place To Die” Is The Football Field

    The sport of football has been under attack in recent years due to the mounting evidence that ties the head trauma and concussions associated with the sport to CTE and other degenerative brain disorders. 

    While there are plenty of people and players who agree that the sport is too violent and they wouldnt want their kids to play, we still have a large number of folks in this country who live by the sport, and would die by it if need be. 

    Just ask New York Jets rookie safety Jamal Adams. 

    According to SI.com, Adams participated in a forum on Monday for season ticket holders that included NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and running back Matt Forte. During a question-and-answer session, a fan asked the panel about player health and safety. 

    Adams, a first-round draft pick from LSU, didn’t give folks the answer they thought he would. He didnt go the politically correct route. In fact, Adams expressed his disgust for the new rules protecting players and inhibiting defenders. 

    SportsNet New York on Twitter

    If I had a perfect place to die, I would die on the field” — Jamal Adams of the Jets https://t.co/yEpIkJZoWj

    ”I’m all about making the game safer … but as a defensive player, I’m not a big fan of it,” Adams said with a laugh . ”But, I get it. But, again, and I could speak for a lot of guys that play the game, we live and breathe – this is what we’re so passionate about.

    Then Adams took it a step further and said he wouldnt mind taking his last breaths on a football field. 

    ‘Literally, if I had a perfect place to die, I would die on the field. I would be at peace. Literally. That’s not a lie.”

    Adams comment was actually met with cheers by the 150 fans in attendance. His comments were also probably in direct response to the recent update and public outcry concerning chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in which Boston University and VA researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association last week that they found signs of the disease in 110 of 111 brains donated from deceased NFL players.

    The flip side of all of this information coming out about brain trauma and the changing NFL rules is that some players still dont like it and are totally committed to football, whatever repercussions lie ahead for playing it.

    There are some former and current players who dont share Adams uninhibited passion for the game. 

    Veteran NFL tight end Martellus Bennett sent a Tweet out in response to the Jets rookie’s comments. 

    Martellus Bennett on Twitter

    I hope All these young cats that are willing to die for the game of football find a higher purpose in life.

    The Super Bowl LI champion felt strongly enough about it to make a second Tweet. 

    Martellus Bennett on Twitter

    Look football is great but I ain’t dying for this shit. Lol.

    Goodell helped clean up Adams controversial comments in order to avoid a social media onslaught. 

    ”I think what he was really making the point of is how much he loved the game and how passionate he is about the game,” Goodell said. ”It’s just something that means a great deal to him. I get the emotion of that.”

    Adams was just keeping it 100. Unfortunately, part of the reason why the NFL will continue to ignore these issues until pistol is held to head and they are forced to make more changes is because players are willing to sacrifice themselves at a young age for the money and glory of a game that has become the fabric and motivating forces in their lives. 

    As an OG, Bennett was basically telling these young boys to wise up. Then again, thats easy for a 10-year vet who has made his money to say. Its like Ice Cube, Snoop and Ice T sitting around dissing the art form that made them millionaires. It will fall on deaf ears. 

    JR Gamble joined The Shadow League in 2012. The General Manager of Content & Social Media is in his 25th year of covering sports and culture professionally. He has covered a wide variety of major sports and entertainment topics across different mediums, including radio, newspapers, magazines and national TV. His passion is baseball, the culturing of baseball and preserving and documenting the historically-impactful accomplishments and contributions of African-Americans in baseball.