When Breanna Stewart left the University of Connecticut after winning an unprecedented four straight NCAA titles, coach Geno Auriemma said that she might be the best of a long list of former UConn icons who have become WNBA All-Stars, Hall of Famers and future Hall of Famers. 

Stewart was a part of 151 victories and only five losses at UConn. She was named the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four an unprecedented four times.

When she was drafted in 2016, Seattle had missed the playoffs in the previous two seasons. Being considered the best of the best is huge props, considering the abundance of legendary players that UConn has produced in the past 25 years from Rebecca Lobo to Nykesha Sales to Sue Bird, Swin Cash, Maya Moore, Diana Taurasi, Tina Charles, and the list goes on and on. 

Last night, with the help of some fellow former Huskies --  Bird and three-point specialist Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis -- Stewart won her first WNBA championship in her third season. Years from now, the night will be remembered as the inevitable arrival of the game’s premier player.

Stewart's 30 points in a 98-82 Storm romping over the Washington Mystics on Wednesday night gave Seattle a clean three-game sweep and its third WNBA Championship in franchise history. The Storm ended the first half with a 16-point lead and never looked back.

WNBA on Twitter

That's a wrap for the 2018 #WNBA season! Relive the TOP 5 PLAYS from #WNBAFinals Game 3 as @seattlestorm clinched the title. #WatchMeWork https://t.co/egkiccmR61


"Seattle Stew" was officially born in 2018 as she took League and WNBA Finals MVP honors, eliminating any debate about who the LeBron James of the women's game will be going forward. Just as Black Mamba relinquished his throne to a younger LBJ, Diana "White Mamba" Taurasi basically passed the baton to Seattle Stew in the Phoenix Mercury's five-game semifinals loss. 

WNBA on Twitter

@breannastewart drops 30 PTS to cap off an incredible season and earn #WNBAFinals MVP honors! #WatchMeWork https://t.co/DGJTspBdJd


Stewart, who also scored 25 points in Game 2 of the finals, led Seattle to the WNBA’s best record (26-8) while averaging 21.8 points and 8.4 rebounds this season. After going up 2-0 against Phoenix, Seattle needed five games to close out a feisty Mercury squad. 

Stewart wouldn't allow this series to extend past Game 3, she was eager to get the champagne popping. 

WNBA on Twitter

🍾🍾🍾 The celebration is on for the 2018 champion @seattlestorm! #WNBAFinals #WatchMeWork https://t.co/lbpqFGY3gB


The next wave of WNBA stars will be led by Stewart a product of a UConn Huskies machine that brings a culture of leadership, teamwork, talent, championship pedigree and visibility to the WNBA game.