‘Operation Knockout’ | Five Men Charged With Murder In 2012 Slaying Of Boxing Legend Hector “Macho” Camacho

27 Jan 1994: Hector Camacho raises his arms and squats in front of a dais during a press conference for the fight between Chavez and Randall in Las Vegas, Nevada. Mandatory Credit: Al Bello /Allsport

Late boxing superstar Hector “Macho” Camacho can finally rest, as his alleged killers were identified in Puerto Rico.

On Wednesday in San Juan, Puerto Rico, five men were charged in a courtroom with murdering the three-division titlist. Additionally, they were charged with the murder of Adrián Mojica Moreno, Camacho’s childhood friend.

The death of “Macho” Camacho has been a ten-year mystery, after a November 2012 incident where perpetrators shot the boxer gruesomely in the face.

The accused are Jesús Naranjo Adorno, 35, being held on $300,000 bond, Joshua Méndez Romero, 30, William Rodríguez, Luis Ayala García, 31, all being held on $800,000 bond and Juan Figueroa Rivera, no age available, being held on $1 million bond.

Justice

“Justice! Justice has been done!”

According to reports, Camacho’s mother, María Matía, exclaimed, walking into the courtroom with a raised right fist.

Justice is coming from multiple jurisdictions in this case. According to reports, three suspects were already serving federal sentences in Florida for unrelated crimes.

They were flown in under the name “Operation Knockout.”

According to reports, another suspect, arrested during predawn hours in Bayamon, was arrested with a towel wrapped around his waist as police surrounded his house. The last suspect was already in a Puerto Rican prison for an unrelated case.

All Accounted For

Additional reports said that authorities confirmed two more suspects were killed in unrelated incidents in 2013 and 2015.

However, according to reports, authorities have yet to ascertain the motive for the killing. Ironically, in 2011 Camacho, according to reports, was shot at three times by potential carjackers in San Juan, although he was uninjured.

“They gave me justice,” Camacho’s mother said to the AP. “I can sleep in peace. I can eat and drink a little cup of coffee in the morning.”

El Barrio

Camacho, 50, was East Harlem’s finest. Also known as Spanish Harlem, Camacho was born in Puerto Rico but raised in the El Barrio section of New York City.

His amateur career was stellar, winning three New York Golden Gloves tournaments.

Once he went pro, Camacho loaded up his skills and charisma to dominate the landscape of big-time boxing in the 1980s and 1990s.

He became a three-weight class world champion, holding the WBC super featherweight title (1983-1984), the WBC lightweight title (1985-1987), and the WBO junior welterweight title twice (1989-1992).

Star Of An Era

Camacho (79-6-3, 38 KOs) fought his era’s most prominent boxing names. He fought two of the four kings, defeating Roberto Durán twice late in Duran’s career and knocking Sugar Ray Leonard into permanent retirement.

He also fought some of the greatest Latino fighters: Julio César Chávez, Félix Trinidad, Oscar De La Hoya, and many more.

Camacho became best known for his flamboyant in-ring style. He would go from leopard trunks to Roman gladiator armor fight to fight, stealing the show before he even laid down fisticuffs.

The flair Floyd Mayweather displayed with outlandish outfits was first done by “Macho.” He was the precursor to Prince Naseem Hamed and others whose style matched their speed and power.

Hector Camacho can finally rest and his mysterious death now has the faces attached to it.

Rhett Butler is a Boxing Writer Association of America Journalist, Play-By-Play Commentator, Combat Sports Insider, and Former Mixed Martial Arts and Boxing Promoter. The New York City native honed his skills at various news outlets including but not limited to: TIME Magazine, Money Magazine, CNN's Wolf Blitzer Reports, and more. Rhett hosts the PRITTY Left Hook podcast, a polarizing combat sports insider's take featuring the world's biggest names.