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TSL Comic Book Convo Podcast: Crown Williams of BSAM and MECCAcon

Recently I tracked down this leader in Black creativity and empowerment.

Recently I tracked down this leader in Black creativity and empowerment. Listen to what she had to say Women in Comics host Regine Sawyer, the upcoming Black Speculative Arts Movement, and much more.Recently I tracked down this leader in Black creativity. Listen what she had to say Women in Comics host Regine Sawyer, the upcoming Black Speculative Arts Movement, and much more.

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The importance of women in the comic book industry, whether as crafters or characters, should be as obvious as the fingers on a hand or wooliness of a beard. Comic books wouldn’t be the same without the artistic and creative talents of legions of forgotten and overlooked women. Straight to the point, that’s why women like Maia Crown Williams are so important. While some individuals are just getting their feet wet in when it comes to recognizing the cultural significance of comic books, as well as the cultural importance of certain comic book characters, Crown has been fighting the good fight via information and discussion for some time now.

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She is the founder of the Midwest Ethnic Conventions for Comics and Arts (MECCAcon) and co-founder for the Black Speculative Art Movement, along with HSSU associate professor and Humanities department chair Reynaldo Anderson.  On April 22, I’ll be moderating a panel on the Future of Black Media at the Black Speculative Arts Movement as it stops at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. 

William E. Ketchum III of Complex, Janicia Francis of Tea with Queen and J., Nay Marie of Taji Mag, and Jordan Calhoun of Black Nerd Problems.  You can also catch Maia, along with other comic book industry experts and creatives, at the Third Annual Women in Comics Con at the Bronx Library Center. The even takes place from 11 am to 7 pm.


Starting his career as lead writer for EURweb.com back in 1998, Ricardo A Hazell has served as Senior Contributor with The Shadow League since coming to the company in 2013. His byline has appeared in the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, the South China Sea Morning Post, the Root and many other publications. At TSL he is charged with exploring black cultural angles where they intersect with the mainstream.